Dr. Laurie Schramm

Laurier Schramm
Corporate
Job Title
President and CEO

Dr. Laurier Schramm is SRC's President and CEO. He has led SRC to become one of Canada’s premier innovation-enabling organizations with exponential revenue growth, and a solid track-record of over six billion dollars-worth of demonstrable economic impacts in Saskatchewan alone. Dr. Schramm has over 35 years of R&D experience spanning each of the industry, not-for-profit, university, and government sectors. He has also been a prolific contributor to the scientific and engineering literature with 17 patents, 11 books, and over 350 other publications and proprietary reports. Many of his inventions have been adopted into commercial practice. Laurie is currently focused on helping SRC to become Canada’s leading technological innovation enabler.

Posts by this Author

headframe construction at nicholson mine
September 18, 2018
written by Dr. Laurie Schramm
The Nicholson Mine was the first uranium mine to be developed in Saskatchewan. In 1949, it was the only active uranium mine in Canada outside the Northwest Territories. By 1959, the Nicholson ore body had been essentially depleted, but the Nicholson Mine had played its role in helping Canada become one of the largest uranium producers in the world. Learn more about the challenges of developing and operating this mine.
Gunnar Mine Site 2011
July 05, 2018
written by Dr. Laurie Schramm
The Gunnar Mine and Mill Site was abandoned with little to no decommissioning after it ceased operation in 1964, leaving behind significant hazards to the environment and public. Learn about the decades after the Gunnar Site closed and what's being done to remediate the land.
historical gunnar mine aerial shot
June 28, 2018
written by Dr. Laurie Schramm
The Gunnar Mine operated from 1955-1963 and officially closed in 1964 with little to no decommissioning. In 1956, it was considered to be the largest uranium producer in the world. Learn about the construction of the site, the operational challenges and the town site that was built - and why it became a ghost town.
open book in a library
May 01, 2018
written by Dr. Laurie Schramm
Time to get out your library card or e-reader, SRC's President and CEO, Laurier Schramm, shares his top five books about technological innovation for National Get Caught Reading Month.
woman with smart glasses
February 21, 2018
written by Dr. Laurie Schramm
Making predictions about the future is difficult but, if the past is any indicator, some future technological innovations will arise out of things that have already been imagined by science-fiction and fantasy-fiction writers.
guy checks metre on pipeline
November 30, 2017
written by Dr. Laurie Schramm
Since the early 20th century, Canada's research and technology organizations have been interested in learning how to measure the economic impacts of their work. Find out how SRC's R&D impact assessment tool works.
engineer works on custom equipment
September 19, 2017
written by Dr. Laurie Schramm
In 2001, SRC set out to become more entrepreneurial, grow in breadth and depth, and include more work for communities (particularly northern and Aboriginal communities) and for government.
black and white photo of pipe loop and building
June 16, 2017
written by Dr. Laurie Schramm
SRC's Maturing Years were marked by growth in staff, facilities and equipment and a focus on applied R&D projects for industry and community needs. This led to the next phase of SRC's evolution, the Commercial Years, which were dominated by contracts with a mostly market-driven outlook, increasing SRC's revenue and importance as an innovation enabler for industry.
Lab worker sits at a bench in a uranium lab
March 07, 2017
written by Dr. Laurie Schramm
Nineteen forty-seven was SRC’s first full operating year. The initial strategic direction for the company was to undertake applied research targeted at developing “the resources and economy of Saskatchewan.”
Reverse Osmosis Unit
December 13, 2016
written by Dr. Laurie Schramm
At the beginning of the 20th century, organized research, development and technological innovation were quite rare, but this changed with the advent of industrial research organizations. Read more about the evolution of SRC.